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Passenger Cars

Hickory CreekNYC 37NYC 43CNJ 556 RDC-1CNJ 1172CNJ 1173CNJ 1178
PRR 413PRR 1547PRR 1715, 1734PRR 9286 Baggage carDL&W 2406 MUDL&W 2541 MUPRSL M-402, 408 RDC-1
NYS&W M-1 RDC-1URHS 317URHS 326URHS 327URHS 329, 331-334NJT 1701, 1721DL&W 3200 MU

 

PRSL M-402, M-408
Builder: Budd Company
Model: RDC-1 – ~600 HP
Built: Sept. 25, ’50, May 31, ’51, #5101, #107
Storage Location: Tuckahoe, NJ

History: These self-propelled Rail Diesel Cars predominantly served between Philadelphia, Atlantic City, Cape May and Wildwood. Originally owned by Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines they were sold to NJDOT in October 1969, numbered 5180 and 5185. In May 1980, the RDC’s were refurbished at the Reading, PA shops. In April 1987, they were leased to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority where they were used as coaches and pulled by a diesel locomotive. In August 1988, they were returned to NJ Transit and stored unserviceable. They were donated to the URHS in 1991. M-408 is the first RDC constructed with cast trucks. One of the two will be restored in “as built” condition and be utilized on the Cape May Seashore Lines for carrying tourists to Cape May from outlying parking locations. The other will be rebuilt and utilized as a trailer to support the same service.


 

CNJ 556
Builder: Budd Company
Model: RDC-1 – ~600 HP
Built: November 30, 1956, #6516
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: While owned by the Central Railroad of New Jersey aka CNJ, its predominant service was on the Matawan to Atlantic Highland shuttle train and on the Newark and Elizabeth Branch. In December 1973, the 556 was rebuilt at the CNJ Elizabethport Shop and in 1974, it was sold to the NJ Department of Transportation. This RDC was one of the two that were assigned to the last run of the Cranford to Bayonne shuttle on August 5, 1978, thus ending all passenger service on the ex-CNJ trackage east of Cranford. The RDC was donated to the museum collection in 1991 and is currently stored.


 

NYS&W M-1
Builder: Budd Company
Model: RDC-1 – ~600 HP
Built: October 16, 1950, # 5006
Storage Location: Carpenterville, NJ

History: In April 1954, this RDC was sold to the Central RR of NJ. Later (date?) it was sold to the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad. It was rebuilt by General Electric in December 1974. In April 1987, it was leased to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. In August 1988, it was returned to NJ Transit who donated it to the museum collection in 1991. The RDC has been operationally and cosmetically restored by New York, Susquehanna & Western Technical and Historical Society who uses it for excursion service.


 

DL&W 2406
Builders: Pullman Co, ACF, Barney & Smith
Model: MU Electric Cars
Built: 1912 thru 1931
Storage Location: Holland, NJ

History: Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR No. 2406 is a low roof combination baggage and passenger trailer, built by Pullman Co. as No.433, between 1917 and 1925. In 1960, it was renumbered 3406. It has a seating capacity of 58.


 

DL&W 2541
Builders: Pullman Co, ACF, Barney & Smith
Model: MU Electric Cars
Built: 1912 thru 1931
Storage Location: Holland, NJ

History: Delaware, Lackawanna & Western RR No. 2541 was one of 141 motor equipped multiple unit coaches, built in 1931 and operating with 3000 Volts D.C. It seats 84. It was renumbered 3541 in 1960. Length of this cars is 70′ 1 1/2″ over buffers, height is 12′ 11″. This car was capable of accelerating a train at 1.5 mph/sec and could reach a top speed of 63 mph on the level track, but could exceed 70 mph on suitable downgrades. Equipped with a pair of roof pantographs that when raised drew electric power from overhead wires. The car pulled electric trailer coaches operated by a motorman. Renumbered to 3541 after the merger with Erie created the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad. Retained #3541 through service with the E-L, Conrail and New Jersey Transit Authority. New Jersey Transit donated the car to the URHS in 198?.


 

PRR 413
Builder: PRR, Altoona Shops
Model: MU Electric Car MP-54
Built: 1913
Storage Location: Holland, NJ

History: Originally Pennsylvania Railroad No. 702 this coach was converted to an MU in 1950. At the peak of PRR commuter operations, there were approximately four hundred MP54s in service including a variety of combine, RPO, and trailer cars. After World War II, a number of MP54’s were rebuilt at the PRR Wilmington, DE shops. The MP54’s operated on Penn Central, New Jersey DOT, and SEPTA through 1981. The North Jersey Electric Railway Historical Society purchased the car for eventual display at a future transportation museum and subsequently donated it to the URHS collection.


 

Hickory Creek
Builder: Pullman Standard Car Mfg. Co.
Model: 5 Bedroom, Lookout Observation Lounge
Built: August 1948
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Originally owned by the Pullman Company, this car and was christened on September 15, 1948, in Grand Central Terminal, New York City. General Dwight D. Eisenhower officiated the celebration of the New York Central Railroad’s rebuilt 20th Century Limited train entering service between New York and Chicago. During its 20 years of service, the Hickory Creek graced the rear end of the “most famous train in the world” and was used in advertisements, promotions, and Hollywood’s finest movies to reflect a standard of excellence in premier rail travel. In 1968, it was retired and sold to Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Circus. URHS of NJ obtained the car in 1991 and contracted Star Trak. to rebuild the car to Amtrak standards. Its inaugural trip was run on June 26, 2005, between New York City and Niagara Falls. It is currently available for charter through Luxury Rail Vacations, Inc. Owned by the URHS .


 

NYC 43
Builder: Budd Company
Model: Tavern Lounge
Built: 1947
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Originally owned by the New York Central Railroad, No. 43 was one of 13 Tavern Lounge cars (Nos. 35-47) utilized over the New York Central’s fleet of long-distance trains. After the Penn Central merger in 1965, the 43 was renumbered (4443) and served on many trains between New York and Washington. Upon the formation of Conrail in 1976 the car was assigned to the North Jersey Coast Line service operated by Conrail and later, NJ Transit. It was retired in 1987 and NJ Transit donated it to the museum collection in 1991. It suffered extreme vandalism while in storage, but has now been completely restored to its “as-built” configuration and ran its first trip as an Amtrak certified car from New York to Washington and back on January 9, 2010, and again on January 13, 2010. It is currently available for charter by Luxury Rail Vacations, Inc. Owned by the URHS


 

PRR 1547
Builder: Budd Company
Model: 21 Roomette Sleeper
Built: ’49 Class PS21B, Rebuilt ’63 Class P85L
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Originally Owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad as their “Cambridge Inn” it was subsequently renumbered to 1547 when rebuilt to a coach by General Electric in 1963, to 5410 in 1980. It was originally painted in PRR Tuscan Red as “Cambridge Inn” and was the last of 48 cars converted from 21 Roomette Sleepers to coaches. It was temporarily used as an “open window” coach on the 614 steam locomotive excursions in 1996 through 1998. It is restored and out on lease now.


 

NYC 37
Builder: Budd Company
Model: Tavern Lounge
Built: 1947
Storage Location: Tuckahoe, NJ

History: Originally owned by the New York Central Railroad, No. 37 was one of 13 Tavern Lounge cars (Nos. 35-47) utilized over the New York Central’s fleet of long-distance trains. Car No. 37 was frequently used on the “Commodore Vanderbuilt” and the “Southwestern Limited” through the 1950’s. With the downturn of long-distance rail travel in the 1960’s, lounge cars were removed from the trains and were stored or added to commuter trains as “smoking/bar” cars. After the Penn Central merger in 1965, the tavern-lounge cars were renumbered (37 to 4437) and served on many trains between New York and Washington. Upon the formation of Conrail in 1976, the cars became available for service on the North Jersey Coast Line and many, including No. 37 (4437) was assigned to that service until 1984. No. 4437 was renumbered to 5450 by NJ Transit and was to be rebuilt to accompany NJT #1 as an additional “official” inspection car, but other priorities curtailed that effort. The car was retired in 1984 and stored in Plainfield, NJ until donated to the United Railroad Historical Society of New Jersey in 1991. URHS had 5450 remodeled and modernized with a 480-volt pass-through system to operate with NJ Transit’s modern Comet II fleet. It was also fitted with a generator and furnace to provide its own amenities without dependence on another car or locomotive. It was used by the URHS as a multi-use convertible car for excursion service until 1997 and is currently in use on Cape May Seashore Lines as a food service /concession /parlor car. It has been re-lettered to its original New York Central markings.


 

PRR 1715, 1734
Builder: American Car & Foundry
Model: Parlor car P-70
Built: 1925
Storage Location:

History: Original Owner was the Pennsylvania Railroad.

PRR #1734 was the last car of Pennsylvania RR heritage to be used by the Jersey Shore Commuters Club aka JSCC; one of the only private commuter car clubs left in the United States, founded in 1933 and still operating today on NJ Transit

The JSCC has a storied place in New Jersey railroad history. From 1933 to 1961, the club car operated on the PRR’s Broker between Bay Head and Exchange Place Terminal in Jersey City, using steam locomotives until they were replaced with diesels in the late 1950s. In February 1951, it was the last car in the consist when the Broker wrecked at Woodbridge, killing 85 (no fatalities on the car, but several injuries).

When the PRR closed Exchange Place in 1961, the Broker ran between Bay Head and Pennsylvania Station New York, with an engine change from diesel to electric at South Amboy. The railcar that provided most of the service during that time, PRR P-70 1734, was custom-built by the PRR to JSCC specifications in 1966. The interior was designed by the late Louis E. Cooke of Rumson, N.J., who had survived the Woodbridge wreck. Cooke also designed the club’s logo, which is based on the PRR’s famous keystone. 1734 was retired along with GGI electric No. 4877 by NJT in 1983, and replaced with newer equipment. 1734 is now part of the United Railway Historical Society of New Jersey collection.


 

CNJ 1172
Builder: Bethlehem Steel Company
Model: Coach
Built: 1925
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Originally owned by the Central Railroad of New Jersey This car was built for service on the Blue Comet passenger train. The Blue Comet was a deluxe all coach train that ran from Jersey City to Atlantic City. The 1172 was named the Westphal for one of the Comets. The Blue Comet was discontinued in 9/41 due to low ridership and after the train’s discontinuance, the coach was utilized in commuter service. The 1172 was renamed the Tamaqua and was predominantly used on the ex-CNJ Raritan Valley Line. Eventually, the car will be returned to the Blue Comet livery and will be operated.


 

CNJ 1173
Builder: Bethlehem Steel Company
Model: Coach
Built: 1925
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Originally owned by the Central Railroad of New Jersey This car was built for service on the Blue Comet passenger trains. The Blue Comet was a deluxe all coach train that ran from Jersey City to Atlantic City.. The 1173 was originally named the D’Arrest after one of the astrological comets. The Blue Comet was discontinued in 9/41 due to low ridership. After the train’s discontinuance, the coaches were utilized in commuter service. The 1173 was renamed the Beachcomber and was predominantly used on the North Jersey Coast Line, but saw service on the ex-CNJ Raritan Valley Line. It will be returned to the Blue Comet livery and will be operated.


 

CNJ 'DeVico' #1178 May-23-2009 Boonton, NJ

CNJ 1178
Builder: Bethlehem Steel Company
Model: Observation
Built: 1925
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Originally owned by the Central Railroad of New Jersey This car was rebuilt by the CNJ for service on the Blue Comet passenger trains which operated from 1929 through most of 1941. The Blue Comet was a deluxe blue and cream all coach train that ran from Jersey City to Atlantic City. The 1178 was originally named the DeVico after one of the astrological comets. It was one of three identical observation cars rebuilt for Blue Comet service. After the train’s discontinuance, the coaches were repainted green and used in commuter service. The 1178 was renamed the Monmouth II in 1968 and was the last open platform car in regular service in the United States. In 1982, it was converted to an inspection car (NJT 1) by NJ Transit and was removed from service in 1993 as the result of an accident. It was donated to URHS for the NJ Transportation Museum collection in 2003. It will be restored either as the “Monmouth II” or as the “DeVico” when funds become available.


 

URHS 317
Builder: Pullman Standard
Model: Coach, 48 Seat
Built: 1950
Storage Location: Tuckahoe, NJ

History: Originally owned by the Great Northern Railway, No. 1216 This coach operated on the railroad’s Empire Builder and Western Star, both premier passenger trains between Chicago and Seattle. In 1970 the Great Northern merged with three other railroads to become the Burlington Northern. The NJ Department of Transportation purchased this car from the BN in 1972 for use on the North Jersey Coast Line. The car was converted to a seating capacity of 106. It was last used in regular service in September 1987 and was donated to the museum collection in 1991. Using funds from a 1997 ISTEA grant. Car number 317 has been restored, named “New York Central” and is utilized in the Cape May Seashore Lines excursion services.


 

URHS 326
Builder: American Car & Foundry
Model: Coach, 60 Seat
Built: 1950
Storage Location: Tuckahoe, NJ

History: Originally owned by the Great Northern Railway, No. 1139 This car was purchased for the Great Northern’s International and Red River trains. It has wide picture windows in comparison to the individual seat windows of the other ex-Great Northern cars. It has been restored as an excursion car and named “Erie” Coach #326 was part of the inaugural train into Cape May on December 18, 1998. It is very close in appearance to the Lackawanna RR 300 series streamlined coaches and therefore might be repainted in Lackawanna colors sometime in the future.

 


 

URHS 327
Builder: American Car & Foundry
Model: Coach, 60 Seat
Built: 1950
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Original owned by the Great Northern Railway, Nos. 1137 this car was purchased for the Great Northern’s ‘International’ and ‘Red River’ trains. It has wide picture windows in comparison to the individual seat windows of the other ex-Great Northern cars. It has been restored as an excursion car and named “Lackawanna “. Coach #327 was part of the inaugural train into Cape May on December 18, 1998. It is very close in appearance to the Lackawanna RR 300 series streamlined coaches and therefore might be repainted in Lackawanna colors sometime in the future.

 


 

URHS 329, 331, 332, 333, 334
Builder: American Car & Foundry
Model: Coach, 44 Seat
Built: 1953
Storage Location: 329 – Tuckahoe, NJ

History: Originally owned by the Union Pacific Railroad, Nos. 5487, 5469, 5470, 5471, 5477 these five cars were part of the 83 coaches purchased between 1950 and 1959 as a general program for renewal of passenger equipment on the Union Pacific. They were built with aluminum skin in lieu of the Corten Steel of the other excursion cars. The Union Pacific sold them to the Great Northern Railway who renumbered them in the 1000 to 1007 series. NJDOT purchased them from the Burlington Northern in 1972 and 1973. The cars were converted from 48 seat coaches to seating capacities of 106 or 108 per coach. They were last used in regular service in September 1987 and were donated to the museum collection in 1991. They have been rehabilitated with 1997 ISTEA funds to be used in excursion service.

CarNumber
329“Pennsylvania”
331“Reading”
332“Lehigh Valley”
333“Baltimore & Ohio”
334“Jersey Central”

 

Comet-1-PS

URHS 1714, 1776
Builder: Pullman Standard
Model: Coach, 102-130 Seat
Built: 1971
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Originally owned by New Jersey Department of Transportation as no’s 1714 & 1776 these two cars were part of the 155 coaches purchased between 1970 and 1973 as a general program for renewal of passenger equipment on the Erie Lackawanna. These cars were the first of the Comet series and were considered state of the art at the time, due to their all-aluminum body shell construction as well as their use of head-end power (HEP). Their automated entrance doors, designed for use with low platforms only, earned them the nickname “Sliders”. These cars were not rebuilt in the 1987 ADA access (hi-level doors) rebuild program and retained their low doors. New Jersey Transit retired the last of the Comet Is in early 2009 and donated these cars to the URHS in March 2006. Now out on lease.


 

DLW 3200
Builder: Pullman Car Company
Model: Coach, 82 Seat
Built: 1925
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad coach 300 was built in 1925 by Pullman with a “low roof”. It was converted to a MU trailer in 1930 and renumbered 2200. In 1961, it was renumbered 3200. Length of these cars is 70′ 6″ over buffers, and height is 13′ 0″. Weight is 109,400 lbs. DL&W contracted with the American Car and Foundry Company to rebuild the cars into electric trailer coaches for New Jersey suburban commuter service. Renumbered in the 1950s to 3200 then to 3000. Part of the 1976 Conrail acquisition then to New Jersey Transit Authority in 1983. Acquired from NJ Transit in 19??.


 

PRR 9286
Builder: Pennsylvania Railroad, Altoona Shops
Model: B-60b Express-Messenger-Baggage Car
Built: 1926
Storage Location: Boonton, NJ

History: This car was originally built by the Pennsylvania Railroad Altoona Shops as a simple 60-foot baggage car. But, in 1964, it was rebuilt as one of forty cars at the Altoona Shops as an express-messenger-baggage car with a toilet and locker for the messenger. It served through the Penn Central years and ended its career as a work-storage car for Metro North Railroad at Stamford, Connecticut. It was donated to the museum collection by Metro North and has been restored to its original appearance in 2007.


Page last updated November. 30th, 2017.